Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey
Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey

Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey

Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey: The pygmy marmoset (Cebuella pygmaea) is a small species of New World monkey native to rainforests of the western Amazon Basin in South America. The species is notable for being the smallest monkey and one of the smallest primates in the world, at just over 100 grams (3.5 oz) (Madame Berthe’s mouse lemur is smaller). It is generally found in evergreen and river-edge forests and is a gum-feeding specialist, or a gummivore.

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Mammalia
  • Order: Primates
  • Family: Callitrichidae
  • Genus: Cebuella
  • Species: C. pygmaea
  • Lifespan: 17-20 years in captivity

About 83% of the pygmy marmoset population lives in stable troops of two to nine individuals, including a dominant male, a breeding female, and up to four successive litters of offspring. The modal size of a standard stable troop would be six individuals. Although most groups consist of family members, some may also include one or two additional adult members. Members of the group communicate using a complex system including vocal, chemical, and visual signals. Three main calling signals depend on the distance the call needs to travel. These monkeys may also make visual displays when threatened or to show dominance. Chemical signaling using secretions from glands on the chest and genital area allow the female to indicate to the male when she is able to reproduce. The female gives birth to twins twice a year and the parental care is shared between the group.

Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey Behavior:

Positive welfare indicators include calm locomotion (relaxed gait), relaxed allogrooming, exploration,play and affiliative behaviours with other marmosets such as relaxed huddling and food sharing.
It is a good sign if marmosets are generally relaxed in the company of their social group and around the human caregivers.

Negative welfare indicators in captive common marmosets include excessive scent marking, scratching, gouging, agitated locomotion (excluding during play) and vigilance (inactive alert behaviour).

Welfare indications also depend on the situation in which the behaviour is performed and how, for how long and how often the behaviour is carried out
For example hurried nervous allogrooming is poorer quality than extended, calm relaxed grooming.  Occasional aggressive behaviours between group members are to be expected but obviously any inflicting wounds or repeated ‘bullying’ are matters of serious concern

Captivity:

Observing primate behavior can be both challenging and rewarding. For group living primates, like the common marmoset, social interactions among group members provide an ideal setting for learning primate behavior.
The common marmoset has been studied in captivity for more than 30 years and in the wild for more than 20. While this means we know a great deal about marmoset behavior, we still have a lot to learn. Common marmoset behavior shares much in common with that of other primates, but like all species, marmosets also have their own species-typical behavioral characteristics.

In the wild:

Observing primate behavior can be both challenging and rewarding. For group living primates, like the common marmoset, social interactions among group members provide an ideal setting for learning primate behavior.
The common marmoset has been studied in captivity for more than 30 years and in the wild for more than 20. While this means we know a great deal about marmoset behavior, we still have a lot to learn. Common marmoset behavior shares much in common with that of other primates, but like all species, marmosets also have their own species-typical behavioral characteristics.

Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey diet:

In Captivity

  • In captivity, marmosets need to be provided with a range of appetising and nutritious food
  • Marmosets are selective eaters
  • Feeding affects growth, disease resistance, lifespan, breeding and susceptibility to stress
  • Commercially available dry pellets containing the necessary nutritional components of their diet should be supplemented with a variety of other foods:
    – fresh and dried fruit
    – vegetables
    – seeds and nuts
    – animal protein (e.g. insects, mealworms, boiled chicken and hard boiled eggs)
  • Marmosets should also have access to as much water as they wish to drink
  • They need dietary supplements to avoid metabolic bone disease
  • Vitamin D3 should be given as a supplement as the marmosets cannot make it in their own body
  • Feed marmosets several times a day to match their natural eating times
  • Provide food in several food dishes, and water at several points, to make sure everyone gets some
  • Place the food dishes at least a metre above the ground (marmosets prefer to feed and eat higher up where they feel safer, especially if they are carrying       infants on their back)
  • Marmosets are susceptible to other problems related to diet (e.g. problems with their teeth, being underweight or overweight), particularly when kept as pets

In the Wild

  • Marmosets have a very varied diet
  • They feed in the early morning and early afternoon
  • At least half their day is spent foraging for food
  • They have to work very hard to get their food:
    – chasing and catching insects
    – gnawing at trees for gum
    – searching for fruiting trees using their memory to help find them
    – climbing and hanging down to reach the fruits and then getting through the tough outer skin to the fruit inside

Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey Care and housing:

Walk-in Enclosure

* Allows marmosets to remain above human head height
* Large space and enclosure furnishings allow natural locomotory behaviours such as leaping
* Small enclosures can have severe welfare consequences
* BUT extra space is no use without complex architecture

Cleaning

* Clean, hygienic conditions are necessary
* Stale food and excreta need to be removed regularly
* A thorough clean of the enclosure should only be done once every 1-2 months
* Scent marking is important to the marmosets and cleaning should not remove familiar scents completely

Climate

Marmosets are tropical monkeys and require:

* Surrounding temperature of 23-28 °C
* Humidity level of 40-70%
* Marmosets
– will choose to go outside in cold weather, but it is critical they can return to the warmth if they wish
– should not be allowed out when it is very cold as they have been known to get frostbite (guideline min. temp: 5 °C)

Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey Reproduction:

The usual inter-birth interval is about 151-156 days. The gestation is varying between 140-146 days. A few weeks before giving birth your female marmoset typically becomes less active.

Do not disturb them while giving birth.  Normally this takes place at night.  Labor typically takes about one hour.  Labor being calculated from the time contractions were first visible to the first young. The interval between infants usually is 2-5 minutes. The afterbirth normally follows 10-30 minutes after the birth of the last young, and is eaten by the female and other group members.  When labor takes to long, get some advice from your vet (caesarian can save the female).

They usually give birth to twins. Sometimes 1 or 3 monkeys are born. When you have 3 babies, generally one of the three dies within the week of birth. It may be necessary to hand-rear one of the three. Don’t underestimate it, HAND-REARING is not an easy job !

All members of the family carry the infants. From time to time they pass the babies back to their mother for suckling.  The male will typically carry the babies around up until it is feeding time.

* After 30 days the babies start to take some food.
* When the babies are 40 days old, they can survive on solid food and milk substitutes.
* Normally suckling takes about 100 days.
* At the age of 6 months, the marmosets can be fully weaned as the breeding female has often given birth again and the subadults start to learn the rearing process to   themselves.
* After 15 to 18 months marmosets can breed.

Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey Facts:

Here are a few fun facts about pygmy marmosets:
* Finger monkeys have the ability to do a full 180-degree head rotation
* Fingers monkeys can jump nearly 15 feet in the air.
* Finger monkeys are known for their long tails, usually more than twice the length of their body around 6 to 7 inches long
* Domesticated finger monkeys tend to have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years if they are well cared for
* There is only a 25% survival rate for offspring born to female finger monkeys

Requirements before owning a Pygmy marmoset/finger monkey:

In addition to prohibitions and restrictions on exotic pet ownership, the majority of countries and states have some sort of permit, license, or registration requirement to possess certain animals.

  •  CITES Permit
  • The health certificate 2 years warranty (Vet certificate)
  • Veterinary Record certificate
  • The transfer of ownership certificate.
  • Sales contract Certified by the Board of Livestock here.
  • The test of herpes simplex virus 1
  • The test of Lymphocytic Choriomenangitis LCMV disease

$2,200.00 (USD) is the full purchase price for a Pygmy marmoset/Finger monkey of either sex
This price includes paper work:

MALE PYGMY MARMOSET FINGER MONKEY (USD)

  • 4 months old   $2,200.00

FEMALE PYGMY MARMOSET FINGER MONKEY (USD)

  • 4 months old   $2,200.00

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